1. An 18th century themed masquerade costume based on the opera Manon, from Le Journal des Dames et des Modes, 1914.

    An 18th century themed masquerade costume based on the opera Manon, from Le Journal des Dames et des Modes, 1914.

  2. A ridiculously adorable pixie costume from Le Journal des Dames et des Modes, 1914.

    A ridiculously adorable pixie costume from Le Journal des Dames et des Modes, 1914.

  3. The sad clown Pierrot and his female counterpart Pierrette were popular fancy dress characters from their Commedia dell’arte origins in the late 17th century well into modern times.
These Edwardian versions of the characters date to 1914.

    The sad clown Pierrot and his female counterpart Pierrette were popular fancy dress characters from their Commedia dell’arte origins in the late 17th century well into modern times.

    These Edwardian versions of the characters date to 1914.

  4. Suggested Halloween costumes from The Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, October 31, 1914.

    Suggested Halloween costumes from The Philadelphia Evening Public Ledger, October 31, 1914.

  5. A modern Edwardian take on Venetian fancy dress incorporating the recently introduced hobble skirt. From Le Journal des Dames et des Modes, 1913.

    A modern Edwardian take on Venetian fancy dress incorporating the recently introduced hobble skirt. From Le Journal des Dames et des Modes, 1913.

  6. Venetian themed masquerades were also very popular in the early 1910s. This 1913 fashion plate from Le Journal des Dames et des Modes shows a couple in Venetian costumes based on the work of 18th century artist Pietro Longhi.

    Venetian themed masquerades were also very popular in the early 1910s. This 1913 fashion plate from Le Journal des Dames et des Modes shows a couple in Venetian costumes based on the work of 18th century artist Pietro Longhi.

  7. The most famous fancy dress party of the 1910s was held in Paris by the legendary designer Paul Poiret of the night June 24, 1911. Called “The Thousand and Second Night” and themed on One Thousand and One Nights, costumes were not only encouraged, but required. If guest arrived un-costumed, or Poiret determined their costumes did not fully support the party’s theme, they could choose to don a costume designed by Poiret or were asked to leave.
Most of the women’s costumes Poiret designed for the event, including the one pictured, featured scandalous harem pants, something that would influence mainstream fashion to introduce the hobble skirt soon afterward.

    The most famous fancy dress party of the 1910s was held in Paris by the legendary designer Paul Poiret of the night June 24, 1911. Called “The Thousand and Second Night” and themed on One Thousand and One Nights, costumes were not only encouraged, but required. If guest arrived un-costumed, or Poiret determined their costumes did not fully support the party’s theme, they could choose to don a costume designed by Poiret or were asked to leave.

    Most of the women’s costumes Poiret designed for the event, including the one pictured, featured scandalous harem pants, something that would influence mainstream fashion to introduce the hobble skirt soon afterward.

  8. A variety of cute, nature inspired fancy dress costumes from Ladies’ Home Journal, 1911.

    A variety of cute, nature inspired fancy dress costumes from Ladies’ Home Journal, 1911.

  9. The Romanovs held a magnificent costume ball at the Winter Palace from the 11th to the 13th of February, 1903. The theme was seventeenth century Russia.
Known simply as “The 1903 Ball” it remains one of the grandest displays of opulence by royalty at the turn of the century.

    The Romanovs held a magnificent costume ball at the Winter Palace from the 11th to the 13th of February, 1903. The theme was seventeenth century Russia.

    Known simply as “The 1903 Ball” it remains one of the grandest displays of opulence by royalty at the turn of the century.

  10. A French maid costume from The Illustrated London News, February 3, 1900.

    A French maid costume from The Illustrated London News, February 3, 1900.