1. Turkish inspired costumes for women became very popular for masquerades in the second quarter of the 18th century.
This woman in Turkish costume was painted holding a traditional black Venetian mask by Rosalba Carriera between 1728 and 1741.

    Turkish inspired costumes for women became very popular for masquerades in the second quarter of the 18th century.

    This woman in Turkish costume was painted holding a traditional black Venetian mask by Rosalba Carriera between 1728 and 1741.

  2. Masquerades continued to grow in popularity during the early 18th century. The wearing of full costumes became more common as did the practice of staying in character throughout the event.
This painting by Giuseppe Grisoni depict a masquerade held at the King’s Theatre on Haymarket Street in London in 1724.

    Masquerades continued to grow in popularity during the early 18th century. The wearing of full costumes became more common as did the practice of staying in character throughout the event.

    This painting by Giuseppe Grisoni depict a masquerade held at the King’s Theatre on Haymarket Street in London in 1724.

  3. "Oriental" attire was not the only costume worn for portraits in the 17th Century. Abraham Willaerts painted the notoriously vain Dutch naval officer Cornelius Tromp dressed as a very noble Roman soldier, no doubt Tromp’s idea, circa 1666.   

    "Oriental" attire was not the only costume worn for portraits in the 17th Century. Abraham Willaerts painted the notoriously vain Dutch naval officer Cornelius Tromp dressed as a very noble Roman soldier, no doubt Tromp’s idea, circa 1666.   

  4. Flemish artist Justus Sustermans painted Ferdinando II de’ Medici wearing the attire of an Ottoman noble circa 1640.

    Flemish artist Justus Sustermans painted Ferdinando II de’ Medici wearing the attire of an Ottoman noble circa 1640.

  5. Increased world trade and an influx of foreign goods to Europe in the early 17th century set off a craze for exotic clothing. Ensembles from the Ottoman Empire, referred to at the time as “Oriental” garb or attire, were especially sought after. It became very fashionable for gentlemen and wealthy merchants to have their portraits painted wearing these new exotic costumes, a trend that would endure for well over a century.
This portrait of an Old Man in Oriental Garb was painted by Jan Lievens between 1628 and 1630.

    Increased world trade and an influx of foreign goods to Europe in the early 17th century set off a craze for exotic clothing. Ensembles from the Ottoman Empire, referred to at the time as “Oriental” garb or attire, were especially sought after. It became very fashionable for gentlemen and wealthy merchants to have their portraits painted wearing these new exotic costumes, a trend that would endure for well over a century.

    This portrait of an Old Man in Oriental Garb was painted by Jan Lievens between 1628 and 1630.

  6. Since Halloween is nearly upon us I though now would be a good time to focus on the history of costumes and fancy dress.
Records of costume balls are found as early the Middle Ages, Charles VI’s Bal des Ardents being a particularly infamous example, and are thought to have developed mainly from traditional religious festivals, most notable Carnival.
Renaissance era masquerades, in which participants often only hid their face rather than wearing full costumes, play very famous roles in literature throughout 16th and 17th centuries. Romeo and Juliet obviously being the most notable example.
This painting by Dutch artist Denijs van Alsloot shows a skating masquerade held on the Kipdorppoort Moats in Antwerp circa 1620. A few gentlemen in the center of the painting are in full costume and several ladies are wearing masks, but most of the attendees are in plainclothes.

    Since Halloween is nearly upon us I though now would be a good time to focus on the history of costumes and fancy dress.

    Records of costume balls are found as early the Middle Ages, Charles VI’s Bal des Ardents being a particularly infamous example, and are thought to have developed mainly from traditional religious festivals, most notable Carnival.

    Renaissance era masquerades, in which participants often only hid their face rather than wearing full costumes, play very famous roles in literature throughout 16th and 17th centuries. Romeo and Juliet obviously being the most notable example.

    This painting by Dutch artist Denijs van Alsloot shows a skating masquerade held on the Kipdorppoort Moats in Antwerp circa 1620. A few gentlemen in the center of the painting are in full costume and several ladies are wearing masks, but most of the attendees are in plainclothes.

  7. Anonymous asked: update! D: is something wrong? I hope everything is okay..

    I’m fine! Really! I’ve just been busy with some non-tumblr-related projects the last few weeks.

    I will resume with regularly scheduled updates later today!

    Sorry for my absence and thank you for your concern :)

  8. karliewu-moved asked: This is one of those blogs that I'd love to have a day and just do nothing but look through its archive and like and reblog everything in it. Thank you.

    Thank you! I go back and look through the archives when I’m bored sometimes too :)

  9. Anonymous asked: Just wanted to say how beautiful your blog is! Have a great day.

    Thank you very much and have a great day yourself!

  10. letskorean asked: I'm sure you've seen this already, but I thought I'd send in case you haven't!! I can't submit links so go to Youtube and search '100 YEARS / STYLE / EAST LONDON'. :)

    A friend sent this to me the same day you did, but I actually saw yours first :) Thank you!