1. By 1683 men’s winter wear had evolved enough practicality to at least include closed-toed shoes, however the thin hose remained unchanged.

    By 1683 men’s winter wear had evolved enough practicality to at least include closed-toed shoes, however the thin hose remained unchanged.

  2. Another Hollar portrait from 1644 shows that women continued to maintain the exposed, low-cut décolletages dictated by fashion, despite the cold temperatures. Fashion and practicality never seem to be compatible.

    Another Hollar portrait from 1644 shows that women continued to maintain the exposed, low-cut décolletages dictated by fashion, despite the cold temperatures. Fashion and practicality never seem to be compatible.

  3. Another Wenceslas Hollar print, this one from 1643, again shows the mask, cap and hood combination, this time with a thin fur stolle.

    Another Wenceslas Hollar print, this one from 1643, again shows the mask, cap and hood combination, this time with a thin fur stolle.

  4. The mask, hood and fur muff appear to have been the standard winter uniform for women of the early and mid-17th century. However, this woman’s interesting cloak is not something I’ve seen in many other portraits of the time period. The drawing dates to 1639 and is by Wenceslas Hollar.

    The mask, hood and fur muff appear to have been the standard winter uniform for women of the early and mid-17th century. However, this woman’s interesting cloak is not something I’ve seen in many other portraits of the time period. The drawing dates to 1639 and is by Wenceslas Hollar.

  5. The hunter in this 1624 painting by Jan Wilders has far warmer clothing that his contemporaries in the Avercamp painting. Yet, despite his very cozy-looking fur coat and mittens, he wears thin hose and open shoes. I’m getting psychosomatic frostbite just looking at him.

    The hunter in this 1624 painting by Jan Wilders has far warmer clothing that his contemporaries in the Avercamp painting. Yet, despite his very cozy-looking fur coat and mittens, he wears thin hose and open shoes. I’m getting psychosomatic frostbite just looking at him.

  6. It’s a week late, but here’s that promised update.
Over the next few weeks I’m going to be focusing on winter clothing, a topic I’ve found to be very interesting, and not very well documented.
Dedicated winter clothing is a fairly recent innovation. Prior to the 18th century dressing for winter involved wearing more clothing as opposed to warmer clothing. Very layered clothing was topped with fur accessories for additional warmth.
If you look at the two ladies in the bottom right of this early 17th century (1610s or 20s) painting by Hendrick Avercamp you can see that, despite the obviously freezing weather, they both are sporting stylishly low cut décolletages and one is even wearing the standard women’s open-sided shoes of the era. Not exactly the warmest attire.
You also can see several women in the painting sporting black face masks, which were popular winter wear throughout the 17th and early 18th century.

    It’s a week late, but here’s that promised update.

    Over the next few weeks I’m going to be focusing on winter clothing, a topic I’ve found to be very interesting, and not very well documented.

    Dedicated winter clothing is a fairly recent innovation. Prior to the 18th century dressing for winter involved wearing more clothing as opposed to warmer clothing. Very layered clothing was topped with fur accessories for additional warmth.

    If you look at the two ladies in the bottom right of this early 17th century (1610s or 20s) painting by Hendrick Avercamp you can see that, despite the obviously freezing weather, they both are sporting stylishly low cut décolletages and one is even wearing the standard women’s open-sided shoes of the era. Not exactly the warmest attire.

    You also can see several women in the painting sporting black face masks, which were popular winter wear throughout the 17th and early 18th century.

  7. The rainbow may be technically over, but there are still a few more colors to do. Today let’s focus on everything pretty and pink.
First off is this absolutely amazing pair of sleeved stays dating to the 1660s.

    The rainbow may be technically over, but there are still a few more colors to do. Today let’s focus on everything pretty and pink.

    First off is this absolutely amazing pair of sleeved stays dating to the 1660s.

  8. Today we are going green. /bad puns
The above portrait of Elizabeth Freake and her daughter Mary was painted in Massachusetts in the 1670s. It quite clearly contradicts what your history teachers told you about Puritans in their plain, all black costumes. Puritans loved color. They believed it was a gift from God and should be celebrated. Natural dyes may have limited the brightness of the colors they could use but, as this portrait shows, they obviously gave it their best effort.

    Today we are going green. /bad puns

    The above portrait of Elizabeth Freake and her daughter Mary was painted in Massachusetts in the 1670s. It quite clearly contradicts what your history teachers told you about Puritans in their plain, all black costumes. Puritans loved color. They believed it was a gift from God and should be celebrated. Natural dyes may have limited the brightness of the colors they could use but, as this portrait shows, they obviously gave it their best effort.

  9. Following right along with the rainbow, today’s color is yellow.
This gorgeous embroidered silk apron would have been used as a decorative piece rather than a functional apron. It was made in France between 1675 and 1700.

    Following right along with the rainbow, today’s color is yellow.

    This gorgeous embroidered silk apron would have been used as a decorative piece rather than a functional apron. It was made in France between 1675 and 1700.

  10. One thing that people of seem surprised by when it comes to fashion history is all the bright colors. Contrary to what history class would have you believe, the past was not in black in white.
To emphasize this, I thought it would be fun to do a “Rainbow Week” this week. Every day is going to focus on articles of clothing of one particular color, covering all historical eras. As the beginning is a very good place to start, today’s color will be RED.
Starting with this exceptionally beautiful corset, stays and stomacher that has amazingly survived for almost 400 years. Made between 1620 and 1640.

    One thing that people of seem surprised by when it comes to fashion history is all the bright colors. Contrary to what history class would have you believe, the past was not in black in white.

    To emphasize this, I thought it would be fun to do a “Rainbow Week” this week. Every day is going to focus on articles of clothing of one particular color, covering all historical eras. As the beginning is a very good place to start, today’s color will be RED.

    Starting with this exceptionally beautiful corset, stays and stomacher that has amazingly survived for almost 400 years. Made between 1620 and 1640.