1. The high waistlines of the Empire and Regency eras meant that little to no adjustment was necessary for maternity fashion.
This lovely Italian round gown dates to circa 1795 and despite its generous waistline, would have been fashionable for women whether they were pregnant or not.

    The high waistlines of the Empire and Regency eras meant that little to no adjustment was necessary for maternity fashion.

    This lovely Italian round gown dates to circa 1795 and despite its generous waistline, would have been fashionable for women whether they were pregnant or not.

  2. This quilted cotton maternity jacket is part of three matching pieces in the Colonial Williamsburg collection. It dates from between 1780 and 1795, and is the only maternity related fashion currently held in the collection.

    This quilted cotton maternity jacket is part of three matching pieces in the Colonial Williamsburg collection. It dates from between 1780 and 1795, and is the only maternity related fashion currently held in the collection.

  3. "The Masquerade on Monday night was very numerously attended, but there was no great discrimination displayed either with respect to the selection or dress of the Characters; the best were men in the female garb. The representation of Aunt Deborah, taken from Charles’s picture in the School for Scandal, was very appropriate, and had whimsical effect. Two or three Billingsgates, and an Old Cloathsman of the Tribe of Judah, were happily delineated, but others were, with very few exceptions, composed of noisy Watchmen, Maids of all Work, and the customary et cæteras of vulgar ribaldry."
(source: The London Times, May 23, 1798.)

    "The Masquerade on Monday night was very numerously attended, but there was no great discrimination displayed either with respect to the selection or dress of the Characters; the best were men in the female garb. The representation of Aunt Deborah, taken from Charles’s picture in the School for Scandal, was very appropriate, and had whimsical effect. Two or three Billingsgates, and an Old Cloathsman of the Tribe of Judah, were happily delineated, but others were, with very few exceptions, composed of noisy Watchmen, Maids of all Work, and the customary et cæteras of vulgar ribaldry."

    (source: The London Times, May 23, 1798.)

  4. The dressing up of children in elaborate costumes continued full steam as the 18th century closed.
Nikolai Argunov painted the son of a Russian nobleman dressed as Cupid circa 1790.

    The dressing up of children in elaborate costumes continued full steam as the 18th century closed.

    Nikolai Argunov painted the son of a Russian nobleman dressed as Cupid circa 1790.

  5. A woman in a Turkish themed fancy dress costume, painted by Jean-Baptiste Greuze circa 1790.

    A woman in a Turkish themed fancy dress costume, painted by Jean-Baptiste Greuze circa 1790.

  6. A circa 1795 Italian striped round gown. This piece very nicely shows the transition from opulent Georgian to more simplistic Regency styling.

    A circa 1795 Italian striped round gown. This piece very nicely shows the transition from opulent Georgian to more simplistic Regency styling.

  7. A 1791 self portrait by Rose-Adélaïde Ducreux shows the artist in an gorgeous striped gown.

    A 1791 self portrait by Rose-Adélaïde Ducreux shows the artist in an gorgeous striped gown.

  8. A regency era coral necklace.

    A regency era coral necklace.

  9. Reposted from my history blog…
Before the advent of the  tuxedo coverage of men’s celebrity fashion got equal attention. These  colorful ensembles were worn to Queen Charlotte’s birthday party in  1792.
(source: The Times, London, January 19, 1792.)

    Reposted from my history blog

    Before the advent of the tuxedo coverage of men’s celebrity fashion got equal attention. These colorful ensembles were worn to Queen Charlotte’s birthday party in 1792.

    (source: The Times, London, January 19, 1792.)

  10. Since I seem to be technologically incapable of reblogging this from my history blog I’m just reposting this here as I thought it might be of interest to you…
Today is the Oscars and with  them comes quite possibly the most annoying question in the world (and  keep in mind this is coming from someone who runs a fashion blog): “Who  are you wearing?”
People’s obsession with celebrity fashion is hardly a new one. The  above is a small section (the whole piece runs two full newspaper pages)  of an article that features detailed descriptions of what was worn by  anybody of note to George III’s birthday party in 1790.
(source: The Times, London, June 5, 1790.)

    Since I seem to be technologically incapable of reblogging this from my history blog I’m just reposting this here as I thought it might be of interest to you…

    Today is the Oscars and with them comes quite possibly the most annoying question in the world (and keep in mind this is coming from someone who runs a fashion blog): “Who are you wearing?”

    People’s obsession with celebrity fashion is hardly a new one. The above is a small section (the whole piece runs two full newspaper pages) of an article that features detailed descriptions of what was worn by anybody of note to George III’s birthday party in 1790.

    (source: The Times, London, June 5, 1790.)