1. Anonymous asked: how is his photography even worth noting when it's just of other artists' works?

    Photographing paintings is not an easy task. They’re naturally reflective and it’s extremely difficult to photograph a 2D object affixed to a wall without some sort of distortion. Add to that the fact that most museums are seriously low on natural light and forbid the use of flash photography and the task becomes close to impossible.

    I consider myself an okay photographer in most cases, but most of the pictures I attempt to take in museums come out looking like this…

    To see Lee Sandstead’s talent all you need to do is look at his photographs compared to others of the same painting.

    For example:

    This is the official photograph of George Clausen’s Brown Eyes taken from the Tate Collection’s website.

    And this is Lee Sandstead’s photograph of the same painting…

    See the amazing detail Sandstead captures? The range of colors and the texture created when Clausen applied the paint?

    That’s why, even though Sandstead photographs other artists’ works, his photography is definitely worth noting :)

  2. I absolutely love George Clausen’s 1880 painting Schoolgirls, Haverstock Hill as it shows normal girls, dressed for their normal daily life.
P.S. If you’ve never seen Lee Sanstead's art photography you definitely need to take a look. I swear he makes some paintings look even better than they do in person.

    I absolutely love George Clausen’s 1880 painting Schoolgirls, Haverstock Hill as it shows normal girls, dressed for their normal daily life.

    P.S. If you’ve never seen Lee Sanstead's art photography you definitely need to take a look. I swear he makes some paintings look even better than they do in person.

  3. A little girl and a young woman, probably her older sister judging by the red hair, wait by an iron fence in Édouard Manet's 1872-73 painting The Railway.
Little girl’s clothing in the early 1870s was often sleeveless and usually had very low cut necklines, sometimes even off the shoulder completely. In cold weather these dresses could be worn over blouses as jumpers.

    A little girl and a young woman, probably her older sister judging by the red hair, wait by an iron fence in Édouard Manet's 1872-73 painting The Railway.

    Little girl’s clothing in the early 1870s was often sleeveless and usually had very low cut necklines, sometimes even off the shoulder completely. In cold weather these dresses could be worn over blouses as jumpers.

  4. Sleeveless over-dresses with distinctive W-shaped necklines, such as the one worn in Renoir’s 1864 portrait of Mademoiselle Romaine Lancaux, were considered especially stylish for girls in the mid-1860s.

    Sleeveless over-dresses with distinctive W-shaped necklines, such as the one worn in Renoir’s 1864 portrait of Mademoiselle Romaine Lancaux, were considered especially stylish for girls in the mid-1860s.

  5. A little girl dressed in her Sunday best in John Everett Millais’ 1862-1863 painting My First Sermon.
Millais followed this painting with one entitled My Second Sermon in 1864.

    A little girl dressed in her Sunday best in John Everett Millais’ 1862-1863 painting My First Sermon.

    Millais followed this painting with one entitled My Second Sermon in 1864.

  6. Venetian themed masquerades were also very popular in the early 1910s. This 1913 fashion plate from Le Journal des Dames et des Modes shows a couple in Venetian costumes based on the work of 18th century artist Pietro Longhi.

    Venetian themed masquerades were also very popular in the early 1910s. This 1913 fashion plate from Le Journal des Dames et des Modes shows a couple in Venetian costumes based on the work of 18th century artist Pietro Longhi.

  7. Woman in Masquerade Costume painted by Frederick H. Kaemmerer circa 1892.

    Woman in Masquerade Costume painted by Frederick H. Kaemmerer circa 1892.

  8. Masked Ball at the Opera, an 1873 painting by Edouard Manet.

    Masked Ball at the Opera, an 1873 painting by Edouard Manet.

  9. The dressing up of children in elaborate costumes continued full steam as the 18th century closed.
Nikolai Argunov painted the son of a Russian nobleman dressed as Cupid circa 1790.

    The dressing up of children in elaborate costumes continued full steam as the 18th century closed.

    Nikolai Argunov painted the son of a Russian nobleman dressed as Cupid circa 1790.

  10. A woman in a Turkish themed fancy dress costume, painted by Jean-Baptiste Greuze circa 1790.

    A woman in a Turkish themed fancy dress costume, painted by Jean-Baptiste Greuze circa 1790.