1. Lavishly embroidered linen jackets were incredibly fashionable in England from just after 1600 until the mid-1620s.
This jacket’s loose fit and simple tie front suggest that it was worn during pregnancy.

    Lavishly embroidered linen jackets were incredibly fashionable in England from just after 1600 until the mid-1620s.

    This jacket’s loose fit and simple tie front suggest that it was worn during pregnancy.

  2. This 1596 Marcus Gheeraerts II portrait of Barbara Sidney, Countess of Leicester and her children is another example of how the wheeled farthingale was worn above the waistline to accommodate pregnancy. Compare Barbara’s waistline to the fashionably pointed ones of her daughters.

    This 1596 Marcus Gheeraerts II portrait of Barbara Sidney, Countess of Leicester and her children is another example of how the wheeled farthingale was worn above the waistline to accommodate pregnancy. Compare Barbara’s waistline to the fashionably pointed ones of her daughters.

  3. Portraits of the time show that the huge wheel farthingales of the late 16th and early 17th century appear to have been a useful tool for disguising/accommodating pregnancy when worn above the waistline.
This portrait of Anne, Lady Pope and her children was painted by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger in 1596.

    Portraits of the time show that the huge wheel farthingales of the late 16th and early 17th century appear to have been a useful tool for disguising/accommodating pregnancy when worn above the waistline.

    This portrait of Anne, Lady Pope and her children was painted by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger in 1596.

  4. This gorgeous circa 1595 portrait of an unknown (but obviously wealthy) pregnant woman, which is most commonly attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts II, is without a doubt the most famous portrait of a pregnant woman ever painted. It is also one of the most beautiful and intriguing portraits I’ve ever seen.

    This gorgeous circa 1595 portrait of an unknown (but obviously wealthy) pregnant woman, which is most commonly attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts II, is without a doubt the most famous portrait of a pregnant woman ever painted. It is also one of the most beautiful and intriguing portraits I’ve ever seen.

  5. The very pregnant woman in this portrait by William Segar (painted between 1585 and 1590) has belted her largely gaping gown on.

    The very pregnant woman in this portrait by William Segar (painted between 1585 and 1590) has belted her largely gaping gown on.

  6. The unknown pregnant woman in this 1578 portrait (possibly by George Gower) has added a stomacher to fill the gap caused by her baby bump.

    The unknown pregnant woman in this 1578 portrait (possibly by George Gower) has added a stomacher to fill the gap caused by her baby bump.

  7. A simple tie closure has been added to accommodate for the figure of the pregnant woman (thought to be  Catherine Carey, Lady Knollys) in this 1562 portrait by Steven van der Meulen.

    A simple tie closure has been added to accommodate for the figure of the pregnant woman (thought to be Catherine Carey, Lady Knollys) in this 1562 portrait by Steven van der Meulen.

  8. A gorgeous 1880s Elizabethan style gown made by the legendary Charles Worth.

    A gorgeous 1880s Elizabethan style gown made by the legendary Charles Worth.

  9. The stripe-themed post was somewhat delayed by a particularly virulent strain of bubonic plague and/or head cold that I picked up as of late. But I present it to you now in all it’s glory, if somewhat lacking in academic profundity as that requires braining and you know, words. I apologize ahead of time for any fever-induced tangents or lack of coherence.
So to begin…
If I ever figure out how to sew and make a Renaissance-era costume it will be this one. The stripes just make it so much fun than the average Renaissance dress.
Painting by Paolo Veronese and dates to the 1560s. 

    The stripe-themed post was somewhat delayed by a particularly virulent strain of bubonic plague and/or head cold that I picked up as of late. But I present it to you now in all it’s glory, if somewhat lacking in academic profundity as that requires braining and you know, words. I apologize ahead of time for any fever-induced tangents or lack of coherence.

    So to begin…

    If I ever figure out how to sew and make a Renaissance-era costume it will be this one. The stripes just make it so much fun than the average Renaissance dress.

    Painting by Paolo Veronese and dates to the 1560s. 

  10. A portrait of sisters Aurelia and Madalena Doria by an unknown Italian artist, circa 1570, again shows the common belief that coral had protective powers for children. The girls are not only wearing coral necklaces, but also have coral beads decorating their dresses.

    A portrait of sisters Aurelia and Madalena Doria by an unknown Italian artist, circa 1570, again shows the common belief that coral had protective powers for children. The girls are not only wearing coral necklaces, but also have coral beads decorating their dresses.