1. I received quite a few comments on the teeny-tiny waists of the Lucile gowns I posted (this one was a personal favorite).
Early in her career Lucile may have enforced the Edwardian couture standard for ridiculously corseted physiques, but it didn’t last long.
Lucile later became one of the most prominent couturiers to publicly support the “big-waist movement”, which expanded the fashion-dictated waist measurement from a heavily corseted 18-inches to a far more natural 26-inches in a matter of just a few years.
This article discussing the movement is from The Washington Post and was originally printed on September 22, 1909.

    I received quite a few comments on the teeny-tiny waists of the Lucile gowns I posted (this one was a personal favorite).

    Early in her career Lucile may have enforced the Edwardian couture standard for ridiculously corseted physiques, but it didn’t last long.

    Lucile later became one of the most prominent couturiers to publicly support the “big-waist movement”, which expanded the fashion-dictated waist measurement from a heavily corseted 18-inches to a far more natural 26-inches in a matter of just a few years.

    This article discussing the movement is from The Washington Post and was originally printed on September 22, 1909.

  2. At first glance this 1905 evening gown designed by Lucile and entitled ‘A Protest’ appears to be just a pretty dress, if not with a slightly unusual name and color combination. The whole truth is far more interesting.
I wrote a while back about the Victorian practice of using different colors or gemstones to spell out messages in jewelry. This dress uses the same practice on a larger scale.
The color combination of (g)reen, (w)hite and (v)iolet would have sent a very specific message to any one in the know.
Specifically: (G)ive (W)omen the (V)ote.
This is a suffragette ball gown!

    At first glance this 1905 evening gown designed by Lucile and entitled ‘A Protest’ appears to be just a pretty dress, if not with a slightly unusual name and color combination. The whole truth is far more interesting.

    I wrote a while back about the Victorian practice of using different colors or gemstones to spell out messages in jewelry. This dress uses the same practice on a larger scale.

    The color combination of (g)reen, (w)hite and (v)iolet would have sent a very specific message to any one in the know.

    Specifically: (G)ive (W)omen the (V)ote.

    This is a suffragette ball gown!

  3. Tina over at the amazing what-i-found came across a wonderful magazine of mid-1920s masquerade costume patterns last year. I think they are the my favorite ever images of flapper-era fancy dress. And pretty darn risqué considering this was only five or so years after women got the right to vote in the US.

    Tina over at the amazing what-i-found came across a wonderful magazine of mid-1920s masquerade costume patterns last year. I think they are the my favorite ever images of flapper-era fancy dress. And pretty darn risqué considering this was only five or so years after women got the right to vote in the US.

  4. A group of fashionable women sporting beach pajamas and huge straw hats on a British beach in 1934.

    A group of fashionable women sporting beach pajamas and huge straw hats on a British beach in 1934.

  5. This 1929 jumpsuit and cape by Jean Patou shows the beginnings of what would soon become a full-blown 1930s trend for beach pajamas.
While it was still not socially acceptable for women to wear trousers in most public settings, exceptions were made for sports and in most resort or vacation settings like the beach.
This particular piece is also significant as it is made of rayon, which as of the late 1920s had only very recently become publicly available for use in textiles.

    This 1929 jumpsuit and cape by Jean Patou shows the beginnings of what would soon become a full-blown 1930s trend for beach pajamas.

    While it was still not socially acceptable for women to wear trousers in most public settings, exceptions were made for sports and in most resort or vacation settings like the beach.

    This particular piece is also significant as it is made of rayon, which as of the late 1920s had only very recently become publicly available for use in textiles.