1. An exquisite velvet evening gown by Schiaparelli, 1934-1935.

    An exquisite velvet evening gown by Schiaparelli, 1934-1935.

  2. I love this dress with a passion. It’s incredibly sophisticated, but with just the right amount of tongue-in-cheek Schiaparelli quirk.
It is amazing how timeless some Schiaparelli pieces are. This dress looks like it could come walking down the runway in 2012 rather than 1936.

    I love this dress with a passion. It’s incredibly sophisticated, but with just the right amount of tongue-in-cheek Schiaparelli quirk.

    It is amazing how timeless some Schiaparelli pieces are. This dress looks like it could come walking down the runway in 2012 rather than 1936.

  3. Just as the 100th anniversary of American independence sparked a series of American themed parties in the late 1870s and early 1880s, the 150th anniversary of the same event created a fad for colonial themed masquerades in the early 1930s. This dress was made by Peggy Hoyt in 1934 for such a masquerade.

    Just as the 100th anniversary of American independence sparked a series of American themed parties in the late 1870s and early 1880s, the 150th anniversary of the same event created a fad for colonial themed masquerades in the early 1930s. This dress was made by Peggy Hoyt in 1934 for such a masquerade.

  4. A charming junior’s knit skirt and sweater ensemble from Fall 1938.

    A charming junior’s knit skirt and sweater ensemble from Fall 1938.

  5. The economic constraints of the Great Depression greatly increased the popularity of the sweater in women’s and girl’s fashion. Sweaters were warm, could be knit at home for minimal cost, and could be paired with skirts which required less fabric than dresses.
The skirt and sweater ensembles seen on this page of the Fall-Winter 1932 Sears catalog were more or less the chosen uniform of schoolgirls of all ages throughout the 1930s.

    The economic constraints of the Great Depression greatly increased the popularity of the sweater in women’s and girl’s fashion. Sweaters were warm, could be knit at home for minimal cost, and could be paired with skirts which required less fabric than dresses.

    The skirt and sweater ensembles seen on this page of the Fall-Winter 1932 Sears catalog were more or less the chosen uniform of schoolgirls of all ages throughout the 1930s.

  6. This 1929 picture of a class of high school students from rural Claiborne County, Tennessee shows a bit more variety in fashion than students from larger cities where trends had a much greater hold.

    This 1929 picture of a class of high school students from rural Claiborne County, Tennessee shows a bit more variety in fashion than students from larger cities where trends had a much greater hold.

  7. A stylish straw hat by Sally Victor, 1935.

    A stylish straw hat by Sally Victor, 1935.

  8. The August 1934 cover of McCall’s magazine.

    The August 1934 cover of McCall’s magazine.

  9. A gorgeous printed chiffon party dress by Walton Pierce, 1934.

    A gorgeous printed chiffon party dress by Walton Pierce, 1934.

  10. A pair of men’s swim trunks by Gantner Wikies, 1934.

    A pair of men’s swim trunks by Gantner Wikies, 1934.