1. A girl wearing a very fashionable winter ensemble circa 1895. I love the button detail on the sleeves. Also note the amazing wooden sidewalk.
My scanner’s not high quality enough to show it clearly, but her cheeks and nose are absolutely covered in freckles. I adore this picture more than I can possibly say.
(From my personal collection.)

    A girl wearing a very fashionable winter ensemble circa 1895. I love the button detail on the sleeves. Also note the amazing wooden sidewalk.

    My scanner’s not high quality enough to show it clearly, but her cheeks and nose are absolutely covered in freckles. I adore this picture more than I can possibly say.

    (From my personal collection.)

  2. A very smart little boy’s striped summer ensemble from circa 1895. I’ve posted this one before, but it’s too wonderful not to post again.

    A very smart little boy’s striped summer ensemble from circa 1895. I’ve posted this one before, but it’s too wonderful not to post again.

  3. A photograph of an absolutely precious girl (her name is Iva) in a simple white dress, taken between 1890 and 1892.
(From my personal collection.)

    A photograph of an absolutely precious girl (her name is Iva) in a simple white dress, taken between 1890 and 1892.

    (From my personal collection.)

  4. A little boy’s velvet suit made by Best & Co in the 1890s. The heavy passementerie trim is meant to imitate similar decoration found on dress military uniforms at the time.

    A little boy’s velvet suit made by Best & Co in the 1890s. The heavy passementerie trim is meant to imitate similar decoration found on dress military uniforms at the time.

  5. Young Victorian boys would often wear dresses or dress-like ensembles until they reached school age. Boy’s dresses were less frilly than their girl’s counterparts and were often naval or military themed.
This particular dress jacket is from the July 1890 edition of  La Mode Illustrée and is intended for a boy 2 to 4 years old.

    Young Victorian boys would often wear dresses or dress-like ensembles until they reached school age. Boy’s dresses were less frilly than their girl’s counterparts and were often naval or military themed.

    This particular dress jacket is from the July 1890 edition of La Mode Illustrée and is intended for a boy 2 to 4 years old.

  6. Velvet knicker suits were very popular for boys of all ages in the 1890s. This particular suit was designed by Brokaw Bros. of New York circa 1890 for a boy between the ages of 10 and 14. At the turn of the century boys usually transitioned to long trousers around age 15 or so.

    Velvet knicker suits were very popular for boys of all ages in the 1890s. This particular suit was designed by Brokaw Bros. of New York circa 1890 for a boy between the ages of 10 and 14. At the turn of the century boys usually transitioned to long trousers around age 15 or so.

  7. The popularity of masquerade parties with the super rich of Paris in the late-1920s stressed the “fancy” in fancy dress.
This amazing ensemble was designed by Lanvin in 1926 for Polish opera singer Ganna Walska, who at the time was generally considered one of the most beautiful women in the world. This fact proved extremely important to Walska’s career as she apparently had a terrible voice and spent the majority of her career using her looks to ensnare of series of six increasingly wealthy husbands.
Miss Walska can be seen wearing the ensemble here.

    The popularity of masquerade parties with the super rich of Paris in the late-1920s stressed the “fancy” in fancy dress.

    This amazing ensemble was designed by Lanvin in 1926 for Polish opera singer Ganna Walska, who at the time was generally considered one of the most beautiful women in the world. This fact proved extremely important to Walska’s career as she apparently had a terrible voice and spent the majority of her career using her looks to ensnare of series of six increasingly wealthy husbands.

    Miss Walska can be seen wearing the ensemble here.

  8. Tina over at the amazing what-i-found came across a wonderful magazine of mid-1920s masquerade costume patterns last year. I think they are the my favorite ever images of flapper-era fancy dress. And pretty darn risqué considering this was only five or so years after women got the right to vote in the US.

    Tina over at the amazing what-i-found came across a wonderful magazine of mid-1920s masquerade costume patterns last year. I think they are the my favorite ever images of flapper-era fancy dress. And pretty darn risqué considering this was only five or so years after women got the right to vote in the US.

  9. A July 1922 La Gazette du Bon Ton fancy dress plate for a Victorian costume. Interestingly the placing of a bustled costume in a major fashion magazine may be more than just a passive suggestion for fancy dress. The major fashion houses in Paris participated in a rather desperate campaign to re-introduce long skirts and bustles to fashion in the years following World War I. A campaign which, obviously, entirely failed to take hold with real women.  

    A July 1922 La Gazette du Bon Ton fancy dress plate for a Victorian costume. Interestingly the placing of a bustled costume in a major fashion magazine may be more than just a passive suggestion for fancy dress. The major fashion houses in Paris participated in a rather desperate campaign to re-introduce long skirts and bustles to fashion in the years following World War I. A campaign which, obviously, entirely failed to take hold with real women.  

  10. This ancient Egyptian themed fancy dress costume is a La Gazette du Bon Ton fashion plate from 1922, the year King Tut’s tomb was discovered and set off a cultural frenzy for anything even vaguely Egyptian.

    This ancient Egyptian themed fancy dress costume is a La Gazette du Bon Ton fashion plate from 1922, the year King Tut’s tomb was discovered and set off a cultural frenzy for anything even vaguely Egyptian.