1. A 1951 Indian inspired bathing suit from the same Carolyn Schnurer collection as this sundress.

    A 1951 Indian inspired bathing suit from the same Carolyn Schnurer collection as this sundress.

  2. A 1951 Indian inspired sundress by Carolyn Schnurer.

    A 1951 Indian inspired sundress by Carolyn Schnurer.

  3. A tiger claw parure made in Bombay circa 1875.

    A tiger claw parure made in Bombay circa 1875.

  4. Tiger claw jewelry became a very popular gift for army officers serving in India to send back to their wife or sweetheart. Possibly accompanied with a (most likely fictional) thrilling tale of the claws’ origins. This necklace dates to 1866.

    Tiger claw jewelry became a very popular gift for army officers serving in India to send back to their wife or sweetheart. Possibly accompanied with a (most likely fictional) thrilling tale of the claws’ origins. This necklace dates to 1866.

  5. Beetle wings weren’t the only bizarre natural fashion trend to find its way to Europe during the British Raj. Jewelry in the 1860s and 70s saw the introduction of a material of even more exotic and dangerous origins: tiger claws.

    Beetle wings weren’t the only bizarre natural fashion trend to find its way to Europe during the British Raj. Jewelry in the 1860s and 70s saw the introduction of a material of even more exotic and dangerous origins: tiger claws.

  6. Beetle wing embroidery for export became a fairly substantial industry in India during the 1850s.
This gorgeous skirt panel was made in Hyderabad in 1855.
ETA: Source for ornamentedbeing.

    Beetle wing embroidery for export became a fairly substantial industry in India during the 1850s.

    This gorgeous skirt panel was made in Hyderabad in 1855.

    ETA: Source for ornamentedbeing.

  7. Beetle wing embroidered ball gowns were the crème de la crème of fashion in the 1850s.
This gown is decorated with beetle wing beetles! and also has a matching shawl.

    Beetle wing embroidered ball gowns were the crème de la crème of fashion in the 1850s.

    This gown is decorated with beetle wing beetles! and also has a matching shawl.

  8. The British desire for anything exotic soon had beetle wing pieces being imported from India.
This unfinished reticule bag dates to the Regency era. It would have been embroidered in India and possibly sent to Europe for finishing.

    The British desire for anything exotic soon had beetle wing pieces being imported from India.

    This unfinished reticule bag dates to the Regency era. It would have been embroidered in India and possibly sent to Europe for finishing.

  9. Jewel beetle wings had been used to decorate textiles in India for centuries prior to British colonization. Their fingernail-like consistency even made them durable enough for use on lightly worn clothing.

    Jewel beetle wings had been used to decorate textiles in India for centuries prior to British colonization. Their fingernail-like consistency even made them durable enough for use on lightly worn clothing.