1. A bib necklace of multi-colored silk rosebuds, Schiaparelli, 1938.

    A bib necklace of multi-colored silk rosebuds, Schiaparelli, 1938.

  2. Insects were a reoccurring theme in Schiaparelli’s work, and featured especially in her Fall-Winter 1938 “Pagan Collection”.
This unusual necklace is from this collection. It plays with the rather icky idea of bugs crawling on your skin and makes it fashionable.

    Insects were a reoccurring theme in Schiaparelli’s work, and featured especially in her Fall-Winter 1938 “Pagan Collection”.

    This unusual necklace is from this collection. It plays with the rather icky idea of bugs crawling on your skin and makes it fashionable.

  3. A collar shaped necklace by Schiaparelli, 1937.

    A collar shaped necklace by Schiaparelli, 1937.

  4. A gorgeous necklace of abstractly formed leaves from Schiaparelli’s Fall 1938 “Pagan Collection”.

    A gorgeous necklace of abstractly formed leaves from Schiaparelli’s Fall 1938 “Pagan Collection”.

  5. A beautifully enameled necklace of fall leaves from Schiaparelli’s Fall-Winter 1938-1939 collection.

    A beautifully enameled necklace of fall leaves from Schiaparelli’s Fall-Winter 1938-1939 collection.

  6. Charles Robert Ashbee was one of the defining figures in the turn of the century Arts and Crafts Movement. Originally an architect, he soon became a veritable renaissance craftsman creating furniture, silver, glassware, and jewelry. This brooch dates to 1901 or 1902.

    Charles Robert Ashbee was one of the defining figures in the turn of the century Arts and Crafts Movement. Originally an architect, he soon became a veritable renaissance craftsman creating furniture, silver, glassware, and jewelry. This brooch dates to 1901 or 1902.

  7. Cloisonné enamel-work, a traditional Japanese art form, was featured at several different European exhibitions of art and culture in the 1860s. It soon became very popular in European jewelry, yet still maintained a distinctly Asian feel. This necklace was produced by Alexis Falize, who was the leading Parisian jeweler to use this technique, around 1867.  

    Cloisonné enamel-work, a traditional Japanese art form, was featured at several different European exhibitions of art and culture in the 1860s. It soon became very popular in European jewelry, yet still maintained a distinctly Asian feel. This necklace was produced by Alexis Falize, who was the leading Parisian jeweler to use this technique, around 1867.  

  8. In honor of the first day of spring I thought I would pull out some of fashion history’s palest pastels and loveliest floral prints to help welcome the season.
These colorful enamel and pearl earrings date to the last third of the 17th century and were made to match this necklace.

    In honor of the first day of spring I thought I would pull out some of fashion history’s palest pastels and loveliest floral prints to help welcome the season.

    These colorful enamel and pearl earrings date to the last third of the 17th century and were made to match this necklace.

  9. An incredible coral tiara made by the Phillips Brothers of London in the 1860s.

    An incredible coral tiara made by the Phillips Brothers of London in the 1860s.

  10. The softness of coral allowed for incredibly detailed carving as seen of this cuff bracelet from circa 1860.

    The softness of coral allowed for incredibly detailed carving as seen of this cuff bracelet from circa 1860.