1. Charles Beaubrun painted this portrait of Anne of Austria in 1638 when she was 8 months pregnant with the future Louis XIV.
I think Anne’s dress is an extremely interesting approach to maternity fashion. Rather than simply altering the waistline, they expanded (and presumably added some creative padding to) the entire dress, allowing the dress to keep the fashionable lines of the time.

    Charles Beaubrun painted this portrait of Anne of Austria in 1638 when she was 8 months pregnant with the future Louis XIV.

    I think Anne’s dress is an extremely interesting approach to maternity fashion. Rather than simply altering the waistline, they expanded (and presumably added some creative padding to) the entire dress, allowing the dress to keep the fashionable lines of the time.

  2. A fashion plate of a French noblewoman in a striped mantua, dated 1684.

    A fashion plate of a French noblewoman in a striped mantua, dated 1684.

  3. Amazing woman’s kid shoe with applied ribbon stripes from the 1660s.

    Below is a detail picture of the amazing ribbon work, which I took this summer when I saw the shoe in person and made a noise that was rather undignified and high-pitched for a historian.

  4. An ostrich feather headdress was also favored by Anne Marie Louise d’Orléans, Duchess of Montpensie and cousin to Louis XIV, in this mid-17th Century portrait by Louis Ferdinand Elle.

    An ostrich feather headdress was also favored by Anne Marie Louise d’Orléans, Duchess of Montpensie and cousin to Louis XIV, in this mid-17th Century portrait by Louis Ferdinand Elle.

  5. This print from 1687, on top of being my very favorite 17th century fashion print, finally shows some practicality when it comes to winter fashion.
This gentlewoman wears a very cozy looking quilted petticoat, longer sleeves and has a visible pocket slit in her over skirt that would have allowed hands to be kept warm inside the skirt.

    This print from 1687, on top of being my very favorite 17th century fashion print, finally shows some practicality when it comes to winter fashion.

    This gentlewoman wears a very cozy looking quilted petticoat, longer sleeves and has a visible pocket slit in her over skirt that would have allowed hands to be kept warm inside the skirt.

  6. Woman’s wear of the late 17th century still strictly conformed to fashion rules despite the cold weather. The court-fashion-dictated half length sleeves were not lengthened for winter. Women instead kept there lower arms in muffs, as seen on her left arm.

    Woman’s wear of the late 17th century still strictly conformed to fashion rules despite the cold weather. The court-fashion-dictated half length sleeves were not lengthened for winter. Women instead kept there lower arms in muffs, as seen on her left arm.

  7. By 1683 men’s winter wear had evolved enough practicality to at least include closed-toed shoes, however the thin hose remained unchanged.

    By 1683 men’s winter wear had evolved enough practicality to at least include closed-toed shoes, however the thin hose remained unchanged.