1. A smart ensemble designed by Lucile in 1911.

    A smart ensemble designed by Lucile in 1911.

  2. This striking asymmetrical dinner dress was made by Lucile between 1910 and 1912. It was designed for a woman in “half-mourning”, the third phase of the very complicated Victorian mourning practices which still lingered in the Edwardian era. Half-mourning allowed for the addition of white, gray and lavender to black mourning garments and also allowed for additional jewelry and ornamentation.

    This striking asymmetrical dinner dress was made by Lucile between 1910 and 1912. It was designed for a woman in “half-mourning”, the third phase of the very complicated Victorian mourning practices which still lingered in the Edwardian era. Half-mourning allowed for the addition of white, gray and lavender to black mourning garments and also allowed for additional jewelry and ornamentation.

  3. This insanely beautiful evening gown was part of Lucile’s debut American collection in 1910. The gown is made of voided velvet and was heavily influenced by the Orientalist craze of the early 1910s.
Doyle New York sold this gown at auction for $35,850 in 2004.

    This insanely beautiful evening gown was part of Lucile’s debut American collection in 1910. The gown is made of voided velvet and was heavily influenced by the Orientalist craze of the early 1910s.

    Doyle New York sold this gown at auction for $35,850 in 2004.

  4. By 1910 Lucile’s popularity and business had grown so such an extent that she was able to open a store in New York City.
Her coming to America was greatly heralded in the press, and she was soon writing a weekly syndicated newspaper column which appeared in papers across the county.
This full page article announcing the opening of her New York store and promoting her as the “Greatest Creator of Fashions in the World” was published on February 2, 1910.

    By 1910 Lucile’s popularity and business had grown so such an extent that she was able to open a store in New York City.

    Her coming to America was greatly heralded in the press, and she was soon writing a weekly syndicated newspaper column which appeared in papers across the county.

    This full page article announcing the opening of her New York store and promoting her as the “Greatest Creator of Fashions in the World” was published on February 2, 1910.

  5. I received quite a few comments on the teeny-tiny waists of the Lucile gowns I posted (this one was a personal favorite).
Early in her career Lucile may have enforced the Edwardian couture standard for ridiculously corseted physiques, but it didn’t last long.
Lucile later became one of the most prominent couturiers to publicly support the “big-waist movement”, which expanded the fashion-dictated waist measurement from a heavily corseted 18-inches to a far more natural 26-inches in a matter of just a few years.
This article discussing the movement is from The Washington Post and was originally printed on September 22, 1909.

    I received quite a few comments on the teeny-tiny waists of the Lucile gowns I posted (this one was a personal favorite).

    Early in her career Lucile may have enforced the Edwardian couture standard for ridiculously corseted physiques, but it didn’t last long.

    Lucile later became one of the most prominent couturiers to publicly support the “big-waist movement”, which expanded the fashion-dictated waist measurement from a heavily corseted 18-inches to a far more natural 26-inches in a matter of just a few years.

    This article discussing the movement is from The Washington Post and was originally printed on September 22, 1909.

  6. A beautifully embroidered evening gown entitled ‘Revelry’, Lucile, 1905.

    A beautifully embroidered evening gown entitled ‘Revelry’, Lucile, 1905.

  7. A tailored walking suit and a dramatically veiled straw hat, Lucile, 1905.

    A tailored walking suit and a dramatically veiled straw hat, Lucile, 1905.

  8. An absolutely gorgeous visiting gown and bolero jacket designed by Lucile in 1905.

    An absolutely gorgeous visiting gown and bolero jacket designed by Lucile in 1905.

  9. A striking lilac opera gown entitle ‘Intention’, by Lucile, 1905.

    A striking lilac opera gown entitle ‘Intention’, by Lucile, 1905.

  10. A gorgeous purple visiting ensemble by Lucile, 1905.

    A gorgeous purple visiting ensemble by Lucile, 1905.