1. An exquisite close-up shot of a model in a Lucile ensemble, circa 1912.

    An exquisite close-up shot of a model in a Lucile ensemble, circa 1912.

  2. A Lucile model in a striking chiffon evening dress and fur shawl. Her laurel wreath headband shows the heavy influences of neoclassicism in the early 1910s.

    A Lucile model in a striking chiffon evening dress and fur shawl. Her laurel wreath headband shows the heavy influences of neoclassicism in the early 1910s.

  3. Another gorgeous hobble skirt walking ensemble by Lucile.

    Another gorgeous hobble skirt walking ensemble by Lucile.

  4. A Lucile model in a brilliantly designed, asymmetrical hobble skirt walking ensemble.

    A Lucile model in a brilliantly designed, asymmetrical hobble skirt walking ensemble.

  5. A Lucile model wearing an amazingly embroidered tunic/robe over a simple chiffon dress. I love how Lucile has her posed as a caryatid to reflect the classical influence of the ensemble.

    A Lucile model wearing an amazingly embroidered tunic/robe over a simple chiffon dress. I love how Lucile has her posed as a caryatid to reflect the classical influence of the ensemble.

  6. The photographs Lucile had taken of her ‘mannequins’ in the early 1910s may appear tame by our modern standards, but at the time they were border-line scandalous.
Lucile did not shy away from using sex appeal to sell her clothing. Her seductively (for the time period at least) posed models were the forerunners of pretty much every fashion campaign of the last 100 years.
Interestingly enough, sex appeal appears to have run in Lucile’s family. Her sister, Elinor Glyn, was an author who pioneered women’s erotic fiction and is widely credited with introducing the concept of “It”.

    The photographs Lucile had taken of her ‘mannequins’ in the early 1910s may appear tame by our modern standards, but at the time they were border-line scandalous.

    Lucile did not shy away from using sex appeal to sell her clothing. Her seductively (for the time period at least) posed models were the forerunners of pretty much every fashion campaign of the last 100 years.

    Interestingly enough, sex appeal appears to have run in Lucile’s family. Her sister, Elinor Glyn, was an author who pioneered women’s erotic fiction and is widely credited with introducing the concept of “It”.

  7. Amazingly, Lucile’s most important contributions to the world of fashion were probably not her designs.
Lucile is credited with hiring and training the world’s first profession fashion models and using them to stage the very first catwalk-style runway shows!
This photograph was taken of one of Lucile’s models (which she called mannequins) in 1912.

    Amazingly, Lucile’s most important contributions to the world of fashion were probably not her designs.

    Lucile is credited with hiring and training the world’s first profession fashion models and using them to stage the very first catwalk-style runway shows!

    This photograph was taken of one of Lucile’s models (which she called mannequins) in 1912.