1. Cloisonné enamel-work, a traditional Japanese art form, was featured at several different European exhibitions of art and culture in the 1860s. It soon became very popular in European jewelry, yet still maintained a distinctly Asian feel. This necklace was produced by Alexis Falize, who was the leading Parisian jeweler to use this technique, around 1867.  

    Cloisonné enamel-work, a traditional Japanese art form, was featured at several different European exhibitions of art and culture in the 1860s. It soon became very popular in European jewelry, yet still maintained a distinctly Asian feel. This necklace was produced by Alexis Falize, who was the leading Parisian jeweler to use this technique, around 1867.  

  2. An Italian made coral necklace from the 1840s.

    An Italian made coral necklace from the 1840s.

  3. A regency era coral necklace.

    A regency era coral necklace.

  4. Corallium rubrum has been used in jewelry for thousands of years. This coral and glass bead necklace is Egyptian and dates to the 4th Century.

    Corallium rubrum has been used in jewelry for thousands of years. This coral and glass bead necklace is Egyptian and dates to the 4th Century.

  5. Beetle wings weren’t the only bizarre natural fashion trend to find its way to Europe during the British Raj. Jewelry in the 1860s and 70s saw the introduction of a material of even more exotic and dangerous origins: tiger claws.

    Beetle wings weren’t the only bizarre natural fashion trend to find its way to Europe during the British Raj. Jewelry in the 1860s and 70s saw the introduction of a material of even more exotic and dangerous origins: tiger claws.

  6. A lovely French necklace with hardstone mosaics of butterflies, circa 1810.

    A lovely French necklace with hardstone mosaics of butterflies, circa 1810.

  7. While doing research about the use of beetle wings in fashion I also came across many pieces that, while not containing actually insects, were definitely insect inspired. Many of them were too amazing not to post, so I’m going to take a little detour from my natural materials topic to share a few of my favorites.
Starting with this gorgeous enameled flower and butterfly necklace from the last third of the 17th Century.

    While doing research about the use of beetle wings in fashion I also came across many pieces that, while not containing actually insects, were definitely insect inspired. Many of them were too amazing not to post, so I’m going to take a little detour from my natural materials topic to share a few of my favorites.

    Starting with this gorgeous enameled flower and butterfly necklace from the last third of the 17th Century.

  8. A beetle necklace from the turn of the century.

    A beetle necklace from the turn of the century.

  9. Circa 1900 Lalique holly berry choker. This would make the most adorable Christmas necklace. I love how even the clasp has berries on it.

    Circa 1900 Lalique holly berry choker. This would make the most adorable Christmas necklace. I love how even the clasp has berries on it.

  10. A brilliantly designed and executed enameled pendant and chain depicting six intertwined snakes. This is one of my favorite Lalique pieces, 1898-1899.

    A brilliantly designed and executed enameled pendant and chain depicting six intertwined snakes. This is one of my favorite Lalique pieces, 1898-1899.