1. A Thomas Rowlandson print depicting a wild masquerade at the Pantheon in London in 1809.

    A Thomas Rowlandson print depicting a wild masquerade at the Pantheon in London in 1809.

  2. "The Masquerade on Monday night was very numerously attended, but there was no great discrimination displayed either with respect to the selection or dress of the Characters; the best were men in the female garb. The representation of Aunt Deborah, taken from Charles’s picture in the School for Scandal, was very appropriate, and had whimsical effect. Two or three Billingsgates, and an Old Cloathsman of the Tribe of Judah, were happily delineated, but others were, with very few exceptions, composed of noisy Watchmen, Maids of all Work, and the customary et cæteras of vulgar ribaldry."
(source: The London Times, May 23, 1798.)

    "The Masquerade on Monday night was very numerously attended, but there was no great discrimination displayed either with respect to the selection or dress of the Characters; the best were men in the female garb. The representation of Aunt Deborah, taken from Charles’s picture in the School for Scandal, was very appropriate, and had whimsical effect. Two or three Billingsgates, and an Old Cloathsman of the Tribe of Judah, were happily delineated, but others were, with very few exceptions, composed of noisy Watchmen, Maids of all Work, and the customary et cæteras of vulgar ribaldry."

    (source: The London Times, May 23, 1798.)

  3. By the 1780s masquerades had become an integral part of the social calender for London high society.
Interest in the goings on at these parties was so great that newspapers would often print a list of the characters the aristocracy had chosen to portray.
This particular list was published in the London Times on February 5, 1788, the day after the Pantheon Masquerade at the King’s Theatre.

    By the 1780s masquerades had become an integral part of the social calender for London high society.

    Interest in the goings on at these parties was so great that newspapers would often print a list of the characters the aristocracy had chosen to portray.

    This particular list was published in the London Times on February 5, 1788, the day after the Pantheon Masquerade at the King’s Theatre.

  4. A 1771 engraving of a masquerade at the Pantheon, Oxford Street in London shows how intricate costumes had become by the late 18th century. Grotesque masks and large props were the norm and characters continued to become increasingly elaborate and bizarre.

    A 1771 engraving of a masquerade at the Pantheon, Oxford Street in London shows how intricate costumes had become by the late 18th century. Grotesque masks and large props were the norm and characters continued to become increasingly elaborate and bizarre.

  5. A 1771 engraving from Oxford Magazine depicts the “Remarkable Characters at Mrs. Cornely’s Masquerade”.

    A 1771 engraving from Oxford Magazine depicts the “Remarkable Characters at Mrs. Cornely’s Masquerade”.

  6. A print from The Gentleman’s Magazine shows the wide variety of costumes and characters in attendance at a masquerade in London in 1768.

    A print from The Gentleman’s Magazine shows the wide variety of costumes and characters in attendance at a masquerade in London in 1768.

  7. Masquerades continued to grow in popularity during the early 18th century. The wearing of full costumes became more common as did the practice of staying in character throughout the event.
This painting by Giuseppe Grisoni depict a masquerade held at the King’s Theatre on Haymarket Street in London in 1724.

    Masquerades continued to grow in popularity during the early 18th century. The wearing of full costumes became more common as did the practice of staying in character throughout the event.

    This painting by Giuseppe Grisoni depict a masquerade held at the King’s Theatre on Haymarket Street in London in 1724.