1. An exquisite close-up shot of a model in a Lucile ensemble, circa 1912.

    An exquisite close-up shot of a model in a Lucile ensemble, circa 1912.

  2. A Lucile model in a striking chiffon evening dress and fur shawl. Her laurel wreath headband shows the heavy influences of neoclassicism in the early 1910s.

    A Lucile model in a striking chiffon evening dress and fur shawl. Her laurel wreath headband shows the heavy influences of neoclassicism in the early 1910s.

  3. A Lucile model in a brilliantly designed, asymmetrical hobble skirt walking ensemble.

    A Lucile model in a brilliantly designed, asymmetrical hobble skirt walking ensemble.

  4. A Lucile model wearing an amazingly embroidered tunic/robe over a simple chiffon dress. I love how Lucile has her posed as a caryatid to reflect the classical influence of the ensemble.

    A Lucile model wearing an amazingly embroidered tunic/robe over a simple chiffon dress. I love how Lucile has her posed as a caryatid to reflect the classical influence of the ensemble.

  5. A Lucile model in a fur coat and high-waisted dress, circa 1912.

    A Lucile model in a fur coat and high-waisted dress, circa 1912.

  6. A 1912 photograph of women in Lucile tea apparel. This photo was featured alongside Lucile’s Her Wardrobe column in Good Housekeeping magazine.

    A 1912 photograph of women in Lucile tea apparel. This photo was featured alongside Lucile’s Her Wardrobe column in Good Housekeeping magazine.

  7. Amazingly, Lucile’s most important contributions to the world of fashion were probably not her designs.
Lucile is credited with hiring and training the world’s first profession fashion models and using them to stage the very first catwalk-style runway shows!
This photograph was taken of one of Lucile’s models (which she called mannequins) in 1912.

    Amazingly, Lucile’s most important contributions to the world of fashion were probably not her designs.

    Lucile is credited with hiring and training the world’s first profession fashion models and using them to stage the very first catwalk-style runway shows!

    This photograph was taken of one of Lucile’s models (which she called mannequins) in 1912.

  8. Anonymous asked: how is his photography even worth noting when it's just of other artists' works?

    Photographing paintings is not an easy task. They’re naturally reflective and it’s extremely difficult to photograph a 2D object affixed to a wall without some sort of distortion. Add to that the fact that most museums are seriously low on natural light and forbid the use of flash photography and the task becomes close to impossible.

    I consider myself an okay photographer in most cases, but most of the pictures I attempt to take in museums come out looking like this…

    To see Lee Sandstead’s talent all you need to do is look at his photographs compared to others of the same painting.

    For example:

    This is the official photograph of George Clausen’s Brown Eyes taken from the Tate Collection’s website.

    And this is Lee Sandstead’s photograph of the same painting…

    See the amazing detail Sandstead captures? The range of colors and the texture created when Clausen applied the paint?

    That’s why, even though Sandstead photographs other artists’ works, his photography is definitely worth noting :)

  9. The ‘photography’ costume from this October 1866 Godey’s plate may be my favorite 19th century fancy dress costume.

    The ‘photography’ costume from this October 1866 Godey’s plate may be my favorite 19th century fancy dress costume.

  10. The Countess di Castiglione caused a scandal by appearing at a 1857 costume ball at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs as The Queen of Hearts, a thinly veiled allusion to the fact the she was currently the mistress of the emperor, Napoleon III.
She was photographed in the costume by Pierre-Louis Pierson several years later, between 1861 and 1863, apparently wishing to preserve the scandal for posterity.

    The Countess di Castiglione caused a scandal by appearing at a 1857 costume ball at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs as The Queen of Hearts, a thinly veiled allusion to the fact the she was currently the mistress of the emperor, Napoleon III.

    She was photographed in the costume by Pierre-Louis Pierson several years later, between 1861 and 1863, apparently wishing to preserve the scandal for posterity.