1. Another early Schiaparelli trompe-l’oeil sweater, this one from the summer of 1928.
I love this one! It’s the epitome of sporty, jazz age fashion.

    Another early Schiaparelli trompe-l’oeil sweater, this one from the summer of 1928.

    I love this one! It’s the epitome of sporty, jazz age fashion.

  2. This cute hand-knitted sweater with a trompe-l’oeil bow was the piece that launched Elsa Schiaparelli’s fashion career.
She made the sweater for herself in 1927 and soon afterward wore it to a society luncheon where it caused quite the sensation. She soon received numerous requests from other attendees to make copies of the sweater available for purchase. Her business soon grew enough for her to open a salon. The rest is fashion history.

    This cute hand-knitted sweater with a trompe-l’oeil bow was the piece that launched Elsa Schiaparelli’s fashion career.

    She made the sweater for herself in 1927 and soon afterward wore it to a society luncheon where it caused quite the sensation. She soon received numerous requests from other attendees to make copies of the sweater available for purchase. Her business soon grew enough for her to open a salon. The rest is fashion history.

  3. Shocking Pink wasn’t the only bright color Schiaparelli used. This blindingly orange sweater dates from between 1938 and 1940.

    Shocking Pink wasn’t the only bright color Schiaparelli used. This blindingly orange sweater dates from between 1938 and 1940.

  4. A charming junior’s knit skirt and sweater ensemble from Fall 1938.

    A charming junior’s knit skirt and sweater ensemble from Fall 1938.

  5. The economic constraints of the Great Depression greatly increased the popularity of the sweater in women’s and girl’s fashion. Sweaters were warm, could be knit at home for minimal cost, and could be paired with skirts which required less fabric than dresses.
The skirt and sweater ensembles seen on this page of the Fall-Winter 1932 Sears catalog were more or less the chosen uniform of schoolgirls of all ages throughout the 1930s.

    The economic constraints of the Great Depression greatly increased the popularity of the sweater in women’s and girl’s fashion. Sweaters were warm, could be knit at home for minimal cost, and could be paired with skirts which required less fabric than dresses.

    The skirt and sweater ensembles seen on this page of the Fall-Winter 1932 Sears catalog were more or less the chosen uniform of schoolgirls of all ages throughout the 1930s.

  6. I’ve never been a huge fan of 70s fashion, but I have a ridiculous amount of love for this 1972 John Ashpool sweater. It is quirky and amazing and I want it in my closet immediately.

    I’ve never been a huge fan of 70s fashion, but I have a ridiculous amount of love for this 1972 John Ashpool sweater. It is quirky and amazing and I want it in my closet immediately.