1. I received quite a few comments on the teeny-tiny waists of the Lucile gowns I posted (this one was a personal favorite).
Early in her career Lucile may have enforced the Edwardian couture standard for ridiculously corseted physiques, but it didn’t last long.
Lucile later became one of the most prominent couturiers to publicly support the “big-waist movement”, which expanded the fashion-dictated waist measurement from a heavily corseted 18-inches to a far more natural 26-inches in a matter of just a few years.
This article discussing the movement is from The Washington Post and was originally printed on September 22, 1909.

    I received quite a few comments on the teeny-tiny waists of the Lucile gowns I posted (this one was a personal favorite).

    Early in her career Lucile may have enforced the Edwardian couture standard for ridiculously corseted physiques, but it didn’t last long.

    Lucile later became one of the most prominent couturiers to publicly support the “big-waist movement”, which expanded the fashion-dictated waist measurement from a heavily corseted 18-inches to a far more natural 26-inches in a matter of just a few years.

    This article discussing the movement is from The Washington Post and was originally printed on September 22, 1909.

  2. Waistlines rose considerably for a brief period in the late 1610s and early 1620s. This high waistline, along with the fashionable edition of lace aprons, created a rather accommodating style for pregnant women.

    Marcus Gheeraerts II’s portrait of an unknown woman (top), often referred to as Portrait of a Woman in Red, was painted in 1620.

    Interestingly, there is a great deal scholarly debate about whether the woman in this portrait and other contemporaneous “pregnancy portraits” are actually pregnant, or simply following fashion trends that make them appear so. Take for example Gheeraerts’ 1621 portrait of an unmarried, and presumably un-pregnant Susanna Temple (bottom).

    I personally believe the Woman in Red is actually pregnant (note her hand resting on her stomach).

  3. A July 1922 La Gazette du Bon Ton fancy dress plate for a Victorian costume. Interestingly the placing of a bustled costume in a major fashion magazine may be more than just a passive suggestion for fancy dress. The major fashion houses in Paris participated in a rather desperate campaign to re-introduce long skirts and bustles to fashion in the years following World War I. A campaign which, obviously, entirely failed to take hold with real women.  

    A July 1922 La Gazette du Bon Ton fancy dress plate for a Victorian costume. Interestingly the placing of a bustled costume in a major fashion magazine may be more than just a passive suggestion for fancy dress. The major fashion houses in Paris participated in a rather desperate campaign to re-introduce long skirts and bustles to fashion in the years following World War I. A campaign which, obviously, entirely failed to take hold with real women.  

  4. This ancient Egyptian themed fancy dress costume is a La Gazette du Bon Ton fashion plate from 1922, the year King Tut’s tomb was discovered and set off a cultural frenzy for anything even vaguely Egyptian.

    This ancient Egyptian themed fancy dress costume is a La Gazette du Bon Ton fashion plate from 1922, the year King Tut’s tomb was discovered and set off a cultural frenzy for anything even vaguely Egyptian.

  5. High school girls in Phoenix model frilly skirts and blouses in October, 1946. This style, inspired by traditional Mexican attire, was incredibly popular with young women in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

    High school girls in Phoenix model frilly skirts and blouses in October, 1946. This style, inspired by traditional Mexican attire, was incredibly popular with young women in the late 1940s and early 1950s.

  6. Knicker suits persisted as popular school-wear for boys up through high school age in the 1930s, a lovely variety of which can be seen on this page from the Spring-Summer 1932 Sears catalog.

    Knicker suits persisted as popular school-wear for boys up through high school age in the 1930s, a lovely variety of which can be seen on this page from the Spring-Summer 1932 Sears catalog.

  7. This 1929 picture of a class of high school students from rural Claiborne County, Tennessee shows a bit more variety in fashion than students from larger cities where trends had a much greater hold.

    This 1929 picture of a class of high school students from rural Claiborne County, Tennessee shows a bit more variety in fashion than students from larger cities where trends had a much greater hold.

  8. The 1925 8th grade class of P.S. 99 in Kew Gardens, Queens wearing clothing mostly conforming to (what an anonymous reader has informed me, thanks :D) the dress code of the weekly Assembly Day, which was standard in NYC public schools well into the 1960s.

    The 1925 8th grade class of P.S. 99 in Kew Gardens, Queens wearing clothing mostly conforming to (what an anonymous reader has informed me, thanks :D) the dress code of the weekly Assembly Day, which was standard in NYC public schools well into the 1960s.

  9. The 1897 graduating class of East Orange High School shows that strict adherence to modern fashion had developed into an unofficial uniform of sorts for High School girls.
While there are a few hold-outs, dark belted skirts, cotton blouses with fashionable leg o’mutton sleeves and bow ties are almost universally worn by the girls of the Class of ‘97.

    The 1897 graduating class of East Orange High School shows that strict adherence to modern fashion had developed into an unofficial uniform of sorts for High School girls.

    While there are a few hold-outs, dark belted skirts, cotton blouses with fashionable leg omutton sleeves and bow ties are almost universally worn by the girls of the Class of ‘97.

  10. This is a repost, but I don’t care because I LOVE this hat!
Gone with the Wind was released in 1939 and immediately started a trend for huge summer hats like Scarlett’s iconic straw one. This amazing striped capeline was made for beachwear the following year.

    This is a repost, but I don’t care because I LOVE this hat!

    Gone with the Wind was released in 1939 and immediately started a trend for huge summer hats like Scarlett’s iconic straw one. This amazing striped capeline was made for beachwear the following year.